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every time i walked into the room because that would change the environment. i change the environment because i was always present but i didn't always want him to interact because i really wanted to document real moments and not change anything. so, that was my role. >> host: you write that it was magical whenever president bush and his father were together. there are a lot of photos of the two presidents bush in this book. >> guest: first of all they look so alike which is really interesting and anytime they were together it was like history in the making because you have two presidents together, father and son. the second son of the president to become president and it was always really interesting photographing them together as a family. they are so normal in lots of ways other than the fact that they are two presidents together. i really enjoyed documenting the family and the entire bush family. >> host: and did you get to know mrs. bush as well? >> guest: i did. >> host: i want to ask about this photo on a very very long couch. how did this come about? >> guest: this was inside t
and i can remember it is in the urban environment where a terrorist is loose with the potential device that is a suicide best if got into a large area he could kill a lot of people so they went to quarantine block by block why there's so many people present there is a blood flow he is lending and people would realize who he was a piece surfaced on the streets so they know that is why it is quarantined. >> these do terrorist remained in close proximity year this scene of their crime,,the scene of the bombings and i think authorities made some pretty good judgments as to whether or not he was much beyond that and a recent successfully he did not it is an impressive display to this point* to managed to contain these to a terrorist as we talk about their lack of training and resources creating a calamitous results. we are getting word now from local media that a neighbor on franklin street has seen police check about that was in her yard -- a boat and we're getting this from local media channels since there was something different about the vote or whatever cover was on its a and called po
-rich environment for the terrorists. we've been waiting for a long team for the next incident, and tragically it just happened today in boston. >> governor, what do you glean from the information that we do have at this hour? what do you glean from the fact there was about a 14-second interval before the second bomb went off? what do you glean from the fact that there were other devices that were, thankfully, found by the police department and they were able to detonate them? does it fit any one pattern of any group? i know it's speculation, but. >> sure. first of all, i want to compliment you, you said we have more questions than answers and i think that's important. we don't want to answer our own questions until we get more information. my view has changed just even in the past couple hours. we know it was a rudiment try, fundamental device. mark furman said you can probably make a similar device with ingredients from your own home. but at one time it was two devices and one two undetonated now there may be as many as five. then the question becomes is there one person involved? unlikely,
, and menlo park. if you forget you will be charged ten cents per paper bag. >> it's good for the environment. we don't have the waste in the landfills and also harmful to animals. >> people have to pay attention to it. if you live in a place where they want you to bring your own bags, then do it. i think it's great. >> grocery stores are still able to provide plastic bags for produce and farm sis can still attribute small bags to hold prescription medications. >>> gas prices continue to slip across the country. here in the bay area as well. analysts say they could be even lower by the memorial day weekend. san francisco has the high spriests in the continental u.s. averaging $4.06 a gallon. around the rest of the bay gas is about 12 cents cheaper. that is down three cents a gallon in the last week. analysts say we could pay 20 cents less by the end of next month. >> let's hope so. >> remember when gas used to be 99 cents or $1 .99 a gallon. i remember those days. >> i just look at the total, sal. of how much it costs. >> it's kind of high. >>> good morning, everybody. the traffic is doing pr
for a few hours, and to institute a special targeting roles, both in the air environment and at the canadian import environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. again,spect to fema, when you saw the response in boston and how coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november boston held a mass of exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event, and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercises courted by the committee to fhrough fema, crease in our ability for response and resilience. we provided several intel products and briefings to law enforcement across the country, critical conner and operators, and we have been reaching out to community organizations who want to know what they can do. we are and lamenting security measures, both seen and unseen, at airports, transit hubs with in the maritime and run it, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is providing security on the ferries in the doing area, and teams are searches on terms of ground transportation and fell like. and finally, with respect to
's a target-rich environment. the fact that they're here and took part of the educational system and one was with a scholarship potentially. it's deeply disturbing and makes you wonder what goes through somebody's mind that can hurt innocent people, women and children and spectators. it's cowardly and hopefully we'll learn from this issue and grow from it. i tell you what, stuart, i don't know what else to say except that god bless everybody who's been saying prayers for us and also for those folks who have been doing their jobs and putting their lives on the line trying to make us all safe. stuart: well said. i'm going to ask you if you'd stay there for one second. i have to take a brief pause so we can go on to delay. by going on delay we can show you pictures coming from the house in watertown and to make sure. we've got to delay to make sure you don't see anything untwoowa. i've got a five second delay. hold on, everyone. now, senator brown, still with us and appreciate you being here with us on a difficult day for boston. would you describe again, the center of boston, downtown? i t
the environment of the blast, these are things that were packed into the bomb. >> i think we are still getting details of all the events that happened, and obviously it's very difficult to conclude, based on initial impressions. i won't exclude completely the possibility that some of the fragments are environmental, but my opinion is that most of them were in the bombs. >> reporter: most of the injuries were to the lower portions of the body. a possible indication of a more sophisticated, directed blast. now of the 31 people who were brought here 12 still remain. six to eight are under anesthesia at this moment. there were four amputations performed here and the doctors say for the most part these were automatic amputations, that the limbs had endured so much trauma the way one doctor described it, they just finished what the bomb had done, jon. jon: so for those who are still hospitalized how is it looking? >> reporter: the doctors won't make any promises, but they said it's looking pretty good. there are some limbs that are still at risk of amputation. also you had patients out here with a l
they have total visual environment, they are trying to evacuate any residents in the area from the neighborhood, and as was noted, now they went to move, the flash-bangs, be methodical. the one thing, they're not certain but they're operating under the assumption there are explosives in that yard. >> you know, i think one of the best examples for your viewers, i'm sure many of them saw "zero dark thirty." there was an initial assault phase, helicopters crashing in and all, then it seemed like minutes went by as people then started deliberately moving through and that's kind of a parallel to what you're going to see happen here tonight. but i think within a few hours of darkness, this could be favorably resolved. >> one of our producers is near the scene. lawrence, what are you seeing and hearing? >> well, i'm at washburn and chester streets, which is about a block from franklin street, where i'm told from a boston police source they have a suspect cornered in the backyard of a home. i'm also told that they're using flash-bangs to try to get him out. the number one priority for
for our country, this attack. whether or not we are living in an environment that looks more like israel and great britain under the ira where these sort of things happen and we become used to them. that is not a reality that any of us want to accept in this country. i wonder if the administration -- which side of this they will fall on. i think we will see from eric holder what their take is really on this when it comes down to the way it's prosecuted. any guthrie action to whether or not this -- gut reaction to whether or not this signals a change. >> reporter: i think they will say to try this american citizen through the normal civil courts, civilian criminal courts, and that may have a harder sell. i'm not saying that is not what is going to happen, i'm not saying that is not what the administration can do, but i think they need to make the case. remember at the height, martha, of the problems that the british had with terror attacks from the ira, they created a special set of courts named for a fabled british judge named lord diplock. they didn't use the formal process for certain
in a challenging economic environment. the question for all of us is how long willho that last that e consumers held up relatively well. i think we alsoly see that in spending and the credit risk -- or formants which have substantially come down verall, they're at close to historical lows. we're performing a50% better than the major bank card issuers. so i think that that demonstrates some view that the consumer health is pretty decent. consumer confidence held up pretty well. but, frankly, david, i've really been of the view not surprisingly that the economic recovery as i look at in the broad scale is going to be relatively slow. i don't have a great deal of confidence that there's going to be any turnaround in the near term. and i think what we've got to hope for is that it >> over the last, certainly over the last four years of this administration part of a long-term trend as i've outlined in the book is using more and more state power to impose a particular worldview called liberalism and i will go into a definition of that so we are not using terms loosely but as a christian i am worried
. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >>> this is ktvu channel 2 news at 5. >>> recapping our top stories, south bay authorities say the two attacks on utility systems appear to be a coordinated act of sabotage. sheriff's investigators say someone shot up the pg&e facility with a high-powered rifle yesterday. there are no suspects in either attack. but today at&t offered a $250,000 reward in the case. just minutes before 5 tonight, we got confirmation, the fbi has made an arrest in the ricin poison letter case happening on capitol hill. two letters tested positive for ricin, a toxic chemical. today federal law enforcement officials arrested a man in the mississippi area. the letters were intercepted before they reached the capitol building. >>> in boston, the police flatly denied reports that they've identified a suspect in monday's bombings. the federal courthouse in boston was evacuated for a time because of a bomb scare. there's now a bay area connection to the pressure cooker bombings used in the attacks. the batteries are manufactured at the
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
concerned many of the new investments in the current congressional environment strike me as a very heavy lift. i have questions about the proposal to allow cbt to accept money from outside stakeholders. in particular, i would like to know how this proposal relates to plans for the uae. i am concerned that the department has yet again proposed to consolidate 16 targeted homeland security grant pot.ams into a single it has been years since consolidation was proposed and they have not articulated the existing grant programs and how they will be maintained. , we limited resources ensure that they are adequately funded. has two major, it initiatives. the immigratre ahe cycurity. -- youources that unique anticipated advances. >> opening statements may be submitted for the record. i would like to introduce the secretary. she is beginning her fifth year of service said one of the most important cabinet positions of the government. is asary napolitan siro governor and attorney general for the state of arizona. and she was also of the united states attorney. record,appear in the and i now recogniz
environment in boston, and they have been here for over a year. >> jennifer, thank you. m.i.t. and harvard, they share a similar town and they share the same river. they are on opposite sides of the river, m.i.t. on the north side and harvard on the south side. we're watching screen left, watertown, massachusetts, ten miles from where we are, about ten miles from the m.i.t. campus. we're not quite sure what police activity is taking there but something is up there screen left. come out to me quickly here where we are in boylston. i want to give our viewers a better sense of the geography of where we are. behind this truck and down the street that would be boylston street. you go down two city blocks on the left-hand side is where both explosions occurred at 2:50 monday afternoon. the runners would have been going down boylston in that direction. at this point in the race they are running from west to east, if you recall some of video we were showing you from the end of that race. but we were told by the f.b.i. that after the explosion bags were dropped, that both of these individuals were
to protect your device from the environment. that's generally where they've been used. colombia, thailand, maybe even in pakistan. so it is kind of odd that they would use that here in a domestic setting. but, again, they don't know -- they don't have any suspect at all. >> it's also important to point out that this is an investigation where all of the resources and intelligence community are being used and they will have a backlog of intelligence they have to go through, intercept, satellite intelligence, signal intelligence, which they can monitor all of this stuff in realtime. >> they can't. and from what they monitor on a daily basis, minute-by-minute basis, from known suspects around the world, they had zero indication from this event. now you go back based on what happened and what you do know, you check cell phone towers and those international conversations and run your traffic through suspicious groups around the world. just speaking to the boston law enforcement source, a federal source earlier today, and a sense of is it domestic? is it international, the answer i got from both
may have already been present in the environment. in fact, we won't know with some certainty until the laboratory completes its final review. away from the scene yesterday afternoon, the jttf began its investigation. immediately after the bombing the fbi initiated a command post that was assigned to the jttf. intelligent analyst and analysts and personnel from every agency associated with jttf and many others on their own including boston pd and mass state police, more than 1,000 law enforcement officers across many agencies had been assigned to this investigation via the command post. they began canvasing sources, reviewing government and public source data bases, and conducting interviews with eyewitnesses and others to determine who is responsible for this crime. we are doing this methodically, carefully, yet with a sense of urgency. all across the nation and around the world, the force of the united states is working hard to locate those responsible. already the fbi has received more than 2,000 tips as of noon today. many of which have already been reviewed, analyzed, and vette
we can eliminate other factors which may have already been present in the environment. in fact, we won't know with some certainty until the laboratory completes its final review. away from the scene, yesterday afternoon, the jttf began its investigation. immediately after the bombing, the fbi initiated a command post. those assigned to the jttf, intelligence analysts and other personnel from every state, local and federal government agency associated with the jttf, and many others on their own, including boston pd and mass state police, more than 1,000 law enforcement officers across many agencies had been assigned to this investigation via the command post. they began canvassing sources, reviewing government and public source databases and conducting interviews with eyewitnesss and others to determine who was responsible for this crime. we are doing this methodically, carefully, yet with a sense of urgency. all across the nation and around the world, the force of the united states is working hard to locate those responsible. already the fbi has received more than 2,000 tips as of
environment, we are warriors as opposed to common criminals who should be should be investigated and based on that investigation prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law? many people have made grandiose claims about wanting to be in a war. how that ends up getting decided is based on facts on the ground. it is based on law and facts not on suppositions or on the grandiose claims of people who would like to be bigger than they are. >> host: him ma shamsi with the aclu, american civil libertis. and cliff may, foundation for defense of democracies. he writes a weekly column distributed by scripps howard news service and contributes to nationalreview.online, townhall.com among other publications a lot of folks want to talk to you. let's get back to the lines. charles, wood bridge, virginia, republican, go ahead. >> caller: thanks. you know i am a republican and i am an american obviously and i, my stance is that, i believe -- [inaudible] >> host: charles, we're losing you right as we get. >> caller: i'm sorry. >> host: say it again? >> caller: thank you, i'm sorry. i believe that the admini
this extraordinary security environment here in boston and the suburbs. understandable why in water where they believe that he may be holed up. that explains the situation around there. they think they know where he is, but not positive. there is a concern for the last couple of hours that he and his brother may have had accomplices and those accomplices may be at large and could be dangerous. this morning authorities found and disarmed another bomb in the boston area. i say another bomb. i mean a bomb today in the boston area. there is a concern about whether there could be other devices. you put all of those factorsing to and that's the explanation for the unprecedentedly strict security in boston and the suburbs right now. >> when you talk about the motivation and their state of mind and why they did what they did including the attempted robbery of that 7-11, you have got more information on the carjacking that occurred. they took a man at gunpoint for about a half hour. >> right. after the robbery of the 7-11 and after shooting the campus policemen. they carjack and got an suv and hel
the business rules fixed for this environment, and we think that this will be sufficient in 14. >> other questions for the record. that last question was something that i know you and i have talked about, how to maximize delivery to the veterans in tough locations, rural locations we will see one coming in a thank you for that effort. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i apologize for being late. i have been following some of the testimony. want to thank your for your service. mr. secretary, particularly for your active duty service to our nation. now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing the resources available to our veterans in a very difficult time fiscally. let me begin with the senators area of inquiry relating to the electronic of record. i had understood that you described what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. >> we're talking about clam's year, completing the claims. >> the electronic record. >> the electronic health record complete certified. >> let me talk. the electronic health record system is still g
of the environment that were involved in the blast. >> reporter: that same trauma surgeon saying some of the patients have to come back again and again for repeat operations. also saying that he has never seen anything, john, like the volume, the quantity of people that were rushed into his er immediately following this attack. >> that's what we keep hearing, poppy. the numbers were just staggering. so how prepared were they really for this flood of victims? >> reporter: you can say fortunately they were prepared. fortunately for a situation as they wished would never happen because they told us they prepare for things like this, massachusetts general, saying that within minutes after they got their first patient and after the attack they instituted an incident command system within five to ten minutes. they had enough surgeons. they even told us they had people flying back in, coming within hours back to the hospital from trips to try to help and do everything that they could. but they were prepared and they do have the hands needed at this point in time, john. >> you know, poppy, i did. i heard fro
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
words of calm. a day later, how is this sinking in? >> well, i think obviously the city, the environment around the city is still in a state of shock. the city will not be business as usual today. many of the streets around us you can see have been closed off, back bay, the entire area of the finish line is closed off and shut down. but like any city like new york, after september 11th, like any city in this country, people are resilient, we'll go on. >> yesterday was a special day for people outside of boston, can you explain? >> oh, joe. >> you know, the sox play, it's a holiday in boston, actually. >> it's a holiday. >> the sox play in the afternoon. you were there with your son. >> it's a traditional holiday. it's perhaps the greatest day for the city during the course of the year. it's a day when the entire city wears a smile. it's a day when hundreds of thousands of people arrive here from literally around the globe and certainly around the nation to run, first, in the boston marathon, 26 miles in massachusetts, to the boylston finish line. the game concludes just as the middle of
... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] is it wrong to buy to match your mani-pedi? shop like a fashionista. not if you find something amazing for less than the price of it. save like a maxxinista. designer brands at t.j. prices. t.j.maxx. [ male announcer ] a car that can actually see like a human, using stereoscopic cameras. ♪ and even stop itself if it has to. ♪ the technology may be hard to imagine. but why you would want it... is not. the 2014 e-class. it doesn't just see the future. it is the future. made the way you say at subwa. with our oven roasted chicken, now a $3 six-inch select. make it your own with melty monterey cheddar or creamy ranch. and during april, the black forest ham is also a $3 six-inch select. subway. eat fresh. >>> 7:23. if you're just joining us this morning, we are following the breaking news in the boston marathon bombing case. these are live pictures from watertown massachusetts. everyone in the boston area, they're being told stay home. stay indoors, don't go to school. don't go to workment don't open businesses. that's bec
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
in this environment or in that square. we have to check the integrity of the buildings. because of that the city is unable to release a time frame when the square will be reopened to the public, when people will come back to their businesses. jenna? jenna: more when we get it, mike. mike tobin live in boston today. jon: charges in connection with the boston terror attacks and the aftermath could come as early as today as investigators continue to look for answers. they want to know if dzhokhar tsarnaev and his brother acted alone. but his serious injuries are slowing their progress. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is live in washington right now. so what are we learning about the fbi's contact with the suspect, catherine? >> reporter: a leading republican briefed by the assistant director of the fbi last night tells fox news the risch shun equivalent of the fbi sent a letter to the bureau that they suspected older brother was a islamist extremist and believe in their cause. tamerlan tsarnaev travel oversees in 6 months, in 2012, that was not on the fbi radar that he misspelle
you can't change and your environment. you can thing about brain diseases as really a disorder of a lifetime. there are things we can do. we can stamen tally active physically fit, socially engaged, eat a heart-healthy diet. >> we do all those things. what else? >> we can avoid head injuries, we can protect ourselves, have good positive lifestyles, no smokes, drinking drug use. i think more importantly is when we find we have a problem go to medical attention really early because one of the biggest risk factors is diabetes and things. >> physiologically was there something? you said less atrophy. what about size? >> the size for 280-year-old looks like the 50-year-old brains and the pew people who had died they study under autopsy, they seemed to have more neurons, more brain cells in certain regions of the brain that are responsible for the higher order of processing. >> in the future do, you think there will be something you can do that will change things? is there a miracle drug? >> if we know why they're staying so robust in theory you can find somet
in an urban environment and there's a lot of buildings around and other materials that will stop some of this evidence as it crawls across the pavement and it will be found. the agents will go in and start conducting a crime scene investigation to find even the most minute pieces of evidence and what we call bag and tag and send to the laboratory. in the laboratory, the forensic scientists, examiners, will look at these pieces of debris and then start making conclusions as to what the device consisted of. >> how do you-- i understand how you could piece together what was the bomb made of. how did it work, how was it detonated and so on. but how-- we're told in the pan am 103 bombing which you helped investigate, that it was a thumbnail sized piece of evidence that led to the identity of the bomber. i mean, how can that be? how can you get to the identity from the remnants of the bomber? >> well, sometimes in pan am 103, the fragment of the circuit board that was the timer that detonated the device, is so generically-- well, not generically, but so specific you can relate that back to
committee that it is an rook anymore-rich environment and mr. speaker, i'm an acronym challenged individual, so i'll be talking about the network and information technology research and development program. in the future i'll call it the program. it's the federal government's main research and development effort in unclassified networking, computing, software cybersecurity, and related information technology. research conducted under this program has led to scientific growth and innovation in several areas, including technologies in science, engineering, and medicine, computer-based education and training, and near real time weather forecasts which is really important in my state of wyoming. currently 15 federal agencies are contributing members to the program and even more participate. so h.r. 967, the bill in front of us, does two things. it updates the high performance computing act of 1991, and it re-authorizes the program to advance our nation's networking and information technology research and development. it's the digital age, mr. speaker. advances in networking and information tech
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
to go and -- to go into a morbid environment. he had enough to think about. so yes, she wrote letters. she didn't have many friends, unfortunately. but she did have this wonderful family who kept her going and there always seemed to be somebody there. as far as reading, i don't think she did very much which was a shame because she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. that intellect and that wonderful education seemed wasted in some ways. >> next question comes from bonnie who is watching us in cincinnati. hi, bonnie, you're on the air. >> hi. thank you for taking my call. this is a most intriguing subject. i do collect albums from the 1840's and 1850's of the central united states. and i do own a journal that was written by a family member of william henry harrison. the harrison family coming from cincinnati. after his death, frequently the letters that do i have, i'm not a member of that family, however i do have several of the letters and albums hand written, journals, and frequently similar to mrs. pierce, in the older women, elders of the family, there is the serious co
whether this came from the environment, right? but it is not. >> i can tell you, as a person who has done trauma surgery, it can be difficult to tell sometimes when you're actually taking some of the shrapnel, wear exactly did it come from. but now they're saying without a doubt, we asked a few times, that there were nails, carpenter nails specifically and, quote, bb-like metal within some of these patients. and so they -- they know for sure it came from the explosive device. this is a doctor saying that based on their medical examination. this wasn't just debris that was lying around. >> what about also quickly in terms of the amputations, i was hearing one of the doctors saying last night, some of the patients were coming to them very injured, bleeding and saying, take whatever you need, i want to be alive. that has to be tough for a doctor, though. >> these are i think heart breaking decisions. it is a -- you can make the decision fairly quickly if that's going to be the best course of action. >> life or death. >> if you don't do the amputation, sometimes it can mean infection, that ca
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
and my being chair of the democratic party and protection of the environment, civil rights women's rights, gay rights economic justice, social justice, central america, anti-quandra, you name it. casey kason was there. i marched alongside of him in so many rallies, i can't tell you. he was a wonderful, wonderful guy. he is best known for top 40. once in a while, he moot lose his temper as he did when he was once asked to give a dedication to a little boy who lost -- whose dog had died and then he had to suddenly go from that into some up-beat song, and casey wasn't happy with what his producers had done to him. here he is. >> dear casey, this may seem to be a strange dedication request, but i am quite sincere, and it will mean a lot if you play it. recently, there was a death in our family. he was a little dog named snuggles but he was most certainly -- going to start again. i am coming out of the record. play the record please. >> not happy when you come out of those up-tempo numbers, it's impossible to make those transactions and go into somebody
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
create if they're released into the environment where they don't have any natural enemies. in seven weeks each female can produce 1200 eggs a year. yikes. will emerge from the ground after florida's rainy season ends. [ screaming ] >> import a bunch of frenchmen. >> stephanie: buy more butter. don't be left unprepared. >> they have python problem in florida and now they have sinkholes and now -- snails the size of buicks. >> stephanie: that sounds awful. >> and your hair would frizz. >> stephanie: not since that appearance for a miami station in august. my '80s hair again. [ explosion ] pay for a blowout straightening and i ironed it. like a minute and a half and. [ explosion ] i'm linked to mob squad again. >> no beauty or vanity in florida in august. >> stephanie: sweating! oh god. i would dry myself with a giant snail. sweating, that's all it is. all right. we were talking about -- oh, we still haven't gotten over the right wing caller even yesterday oh how come you aren't blaming obama? everyone blamed bush the same day 9-11 happened. [ buzzer ] which is complete crap. really bad anal
and debris, the kind of things that could have been picked up from the environment when the woman went off, jenna. jenna: mike, no arrests yet and we're seeing video from the scene that day, how is security in the city of boston? >> reporter: we are really seeing an increase in security. just behind me there is a armored vehicle parked in front of massachusetts general hospital. we see an increase in the yellowjackets of city police officers who are out there. state troopers increased their numbers in the city of boston by 100 to augment the city police there. they're deployed at every hospital. they're deployed at the statehouse and they're deployed at the metro boston transit authority stops. additional troopers have been sent to the airport, jenna. jenna: more on this as we get it. mike, thank you. jon: we are also following some breaking developments out of capitol hill after a letter sent to the office of senator roger wicker tests positive for the potentially fatal substance ricin. peter doocy is live outside the senate mail facility in hyattsville, maryland where the letter was inte
of our natural environment, and it's not -- it's not the best feeling in the world to feel like you're stuck indefinitely in your apartment, and you don't feel particularly safe. like our windows aren't bulletproof or anything. and to hear cop cars going speeding by every few minutes. it's jarring. >> and have you been -- obviously your husband was texted by his work not to come in to work so you were alerted as to what the situation was. but we've been told that police were robo calling or what's called a reverse 911 calling all residents of watertown. have you been told -- >> let's just tell you what's happening behind us right now. just to be clear, what's happening right now is that police cars are behind us right now, and businesses, filled -- filled with police are driving right behind us right now. presumably headed i don't know where, because the scope of this investigation is getting wider and wider by the minute. we just saw two buses filled with law enforcement personnel leaving us. they're headed west. that could easily be to the watertown area. which is the epicenter of
to celebrate that in a family environment in a fun way. other people look at us differently. they look at patriotism as their enemy. they look at inon sense americans as targets. we are in a war here and we've got to deal with it accordingly. >> mayor, if you had to pinpoint some of issues, you bring up some of the difficulties in some of the ways that americans have to grapple with the idea of losing freedom, but also the idea of making sure that you feel secure in any of these areas. we talked to an analyst this morning who pointed out that the largest population of north secaucus former residents have to be in watertown, massachusetts, this is where this is all taking out and you live in a town that's a melting pot and has been for a long time. does that make it more difficult? >> boston area diversity has always been its strength, a large, young, student population, many from foreign countries have been our strength over the past years, over the past many years, but today we are vulnerable from international terrorist organizations that come into our city, come into our area and we
down and hone in on any place and anybody in this environment, this young man primarily and any family members who may know where he is. i'm looking at couple shots we're getting here. back in watertown, you have ongoing presence of the police there as well. they're trying to focus in where he may have gone, if he remains in watertown. if he was able to slip perhaps out of that cordon and if indeed he is still on the run, bill. bill: yeah. martha, just one thing to add from boston on that. we're hearing that logan airport has been closed. we can't confirm it but we're being working to that. some folks are saying trying to book to flights in washington and those flights are being diverted. "the boston globe" is saying the m.i.t. police officer that was killed in a confrontation with these terror suspects was sean collier, age 26, out of summerville, massachusetts. per the district attorney in middlesex county. it is possible that sean come letter, age 26, will indeed be the hero of this story and sitting in his car and gunned down in his car we don't know what he saw. it is possible he
chechnyans, correct? >> most of those aren't chechnyan. they come from a different environment for home-based operations. most of the people we company chur on the bale field coming be from the surrounding areas. >> there's a facebook page for dzhokhar tsarnaev. in any event, at least two sources who know him say that this is his twitter page, and on it he had, i think, over a dozen, 14 posts since the boston marathon bombings including this one on april 17th. i'm a stress-free kind of guy. i'm a stress-free kind of guy. then another one. another one saying, hold on, let me find it. yeah. okay. here it is. nowadays everybody want to talk like they got something to say but nothing comes out when they move their lips, just a bunch of jibberrish. i believe that's on his mind. i believe that's a quote of a song. days after authorities say he bombed the boston marathon, took the life of three innocent people and severely wounded or maimed nearly 200 of the citizens that he was living amongst. we are back in three minutes. as we wait to hear now from the suspect's father. plus we take another
. their concern is autonomy. there are actors within that environment. for them, had this been directly tied to have these two individuals been directly tied to those groups, i would be surprised if they didn't want to claim it. there are anti-american sentiments. host: what surprised you the most as you go through this data? guest: one of the positive surprises was the willingness of the american people and working with law enforcement and department of homeland security in a way similar to the administration strategy for preventing violent extremism. a community-oriented approach that will increase community between -- communication between the community and government, and prevent radicalization from happening in the first place, and if it does occur, allowing the government and community to deal with it in a positive way before a terrorist plot is hatched. 57% of respondents indicated a willingness to work with law enforcement and dhs to establish those relationships ahead of time. positive story. i see a lot of value in a community-oriented approach towards these counter radicalization.
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